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Nature's Remarkable Food

In order to produce honey, bees require good nutrition and health. Bees get their sugar, mineral and carborhyrdate requirements from nectar, the sugary substance that is naturally produced by flowers. Then, just as all animals, bees also require amino acids, minerals and proteins which they obtain from plant pollen.  Flower nectar is also used to make honey, whereas bees use the pollen just as food.

Making the honey

A small group of forager worker bees will go scouting in search of nectar and pollen. When a scout finds good foraging, she will fly back to the hive and inform other foragers where they need to go to find the source. This is done through dances, vibrations and chemical signals.

When a good foraging site has been found, the foragers fly out to collect the nectar and dip their proboscis into the flower and suck up the nectar. They store the nectar inside a pouch inside their body called a ‘honey sac’ and return to the hive. Once back at the hive, the foragers then transfer the nectar from the honey sac into the mouths of the worker bees in the hive. This adds special enzymes into the nectar which helps it turn into honey.

The worker bees then place the nectar into honeycomb cells where it changes into honey through the process of ripening. During ripening, the nectar sugars called sucrose change into honey sugars called glucose, fructose and maltose. When the honey is fully ripened, the workers cap the filled honeycomb with beeswax.

Honey is a concentrated carbohydrate solution containing a mix of simple and complex sugars. The three main sugars are Fructose, Glucose and Sucrose. Australian honeys usually contain 36-50% fructose, 28-36% glucose and 0.8-15% sucrose, depending on the floral source[1].

      • Fructose is the sugar typically found in fruits. It is quite easily converted to glucose in the body. What doesn’t get used right away is stored as fat.
      • Glucose provides the most efficient energy to every cell in our body, including the brain. Our body is able to create glucose from various sugars and other substances in our diet, but these metabolic transformations consume energy. The brain is a special organ in that the only source of energy (fuel) that is used under normal conditions is glucose[2]. So if you are needing brain energy, think glucose!
      • Sucrose is what we commonly know as white table sugar and it is extracted from sugar cane or sugar beet, after a lot of processing. Sucrose is a disaccharide, formed from the joining together of fructose and glucose. It is broken down in the body to its component monosaccharides before further metabolism. This means sucrose gives 50% fructose and 50% glucose.
      • Other carbohydrates include a number of oligosaccharides (up to 25 have been identified)[3]. Some of these compounds are not digested or absorbed in the small intestine reaching the large intestine intact. 

 

Preliminary studies on a selection of Australian honeys have identified considerable variation in sugar content. Honey composition is known to vary depending not only on the floral source, but also the particular season as well as other factors. An Australian honey with a relatively medium level of glucose was found to be Ironbark, [4] making this a reasonable choice if you’re looking for fast energy. Relative to sucrose, fructose is 1.2-1.8 times sweeter[1]. So, if sweetness is what you are after, then choose a honey that is rich in fructose such as Yellow Box [4]. Commercial blends generally had a lower fructose content and may not taste quite as sweet.
Due to honey being a lot sweeter compared to table sugar, a little goes a long way. This means for every one teaspoon of cane sugar, you can confidently only use ½ a teaspoon of honey and reduce your sugar intake significantly! SWEET!

Additional elements in honey

In much the same way as cows make milk for their calves, bees make honey specifically for their young, so it’s got to contain more than just sugar. Honey typically contains many minor components such as organic acids, proteins, amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and polyphenols contributing to the specific aroma, color, and flavor of the honey[3]. These include:

      • Proteins: Either from the nectar itself or added by the bees, protein typically found in honey includes enzymes such as phosphatase, amylase, glucose oxidase, invertase, diastase and catalase[5]. These enzymes act in the ripening and preservation of the honey for the benefit of the bee larvae[6].
      • Trace elements: Honey contains a total of 54 minerals and elements have been reported to be present in honeys examined all over the world.
Avg QuantityPer ServePer 100g
Energy212kJ1416kJ
Protein0.05g0.3g
Fat – Total0g0g
– Saturated0g0g
– Trans0g0g
Cholesterol0mg0mg
Carbohydrate12.5g83.1g
– Sugars*12.4g82.5g
Sodium2.3mg15mg

*Sugars naturally occurring in honey.

Ingredients: 100% Pure Australian honey sourced from Eucalypt and ground flora.
Storage instructions: Store at room temperature 

  • Cane sugar presents little to no minerals/vitamins and is a processed plant product. Table sugar is produced by shredding, rolling and boiling cane sugar until it can be centrifuged to separate the sugar from molasses. The remaining product is tumble dried then shifted off in bulk to be refined further into granules, crystals, liquids, etc.
  • Artificial sweeteners are man-made sugar substitutes that are often derived by breaking down the organic molecular structure of natural sugars or are artificially synthesised amino acids. These include Aspartame, Sucralose, Saccharin and Xylitol. Artificial Sweeteners are highly unnatural and contain compounds that have been the subject of many health studies.
  • Stevia is highly processed extract of the stevia rebaudiana plant that is native to South America and is part of the sunflower family. The extract, called Rebaudioside, is derived by the process of “water extraction from the dried leaves, followed by clarification and crystallisation. Most commercial processes consist of water extraction, decolouration, and purification using ion-exchange resins, electrolytic techniques, or precipitating agents,” according to SteviaPowder.com.
  • Agave is another natural plant substance that undergoes intense processing and refining, so ends up being more like a sugar syrup and not a pure, natural product. Agave also has a much higher ratio of fructose than honey or cane sugar.
  • Rice Malt Syrup is often referred to a healthier sugar alternative by those wanting to avoid fructose. However, like other sweeteners, it too must go through processing before it is a finished product, meaning it’s not 100% naturally occurring like honey.
  • Maple Syrup is typically used as a better option to sugar. However, many people fall into the trap of tricky food labels that may mislead you into buying Maple ‘Flavoured’ Syrup in oppose to ‘Pure’ Maple Syrup, making it a very unhealthy option if you’ve been tricked into buying a high fructose ‘maple flavoured’ product. Maple Syrup, like other sweeteners on this list, is also processed prior to bottling. Once the sap from the Maple trees has been harvested, it is boiled down to become a syrup. Once evaporation is complete, the finished product is bottled or canned and shipped, meaning it has large food mileage. As Maple Syrup is made only in North America, it is unable to be produced in Australia and classified as an Australian made product compared to our 100% pure Australian honey that’s been proudly supplied by over 600 Aussie beekeeping families.

Based on other commercially available sweeteners we can conclude that honey, made and naturally ripened by bees, is the most natural. At Capilano, we leave it up to the bees so the process of packaging our honey is simple:

      • Beekeepers hand collect 100% natural Australian honey.
      • The honey is delivered to us for bottling.
      • Minimal handling is used, with the honey only being gently warmed and filtered to remove any wax or bee materials (with the exception of our Raw, Unfiltered and Certified Organic ranges).

 

Compared to other sweeteners, Capilano honey remains a 100% natural, all Aussie sweetener with low food mileage. 

Honey is sweeter on the palate than cane sugar, meaning you can use less to achieve the same great taste.

CAPILANO

Our Aussie Honey

Our high quality, Classic Pure Australian range has graced Aussie brekky tables for generations. The honey we use in these family favourites is a symphony of 100% pure Australian eucalyptus and ground flora honeys. Mild in flavour, this range makes a perfect allrounder honey.

With every serve of Capilano…

We promise to love and care for the bees that make it. To support the beekeepers that harvest it and help ensure their futures. To quality check every drop and deliver it, pure and simply to your home.

Where is Capilano Classic Honey sourced?

The Capilano Classic Honey range has been proudly Australian owned since 1953. Sourced from over 600 beekeeping families from across the country, we offer our customers a true, safe, and high-quality ‘hive to home’ experience.

Our everyday Classic Honey range

A unique blend… our premium Classic Honey is a symphony of 100% pure, high quality Australian eucalyptus and ground flora honeys. Mild in flavour, this honey makes a perfect allrounder for the family. 

Enjoy our Classic honey… as a natural sweetener, drizzled on toast, porridge and crumpets or swirled into a warm glass of water or a smoothie.

Taste… mild, golden flavour with a smooth, sweet finish.

All Capilano product are packed in PET that is BPA-free.

Where does Capilano Honey come from?

Capilano’s premium Australian honey is sourced from Australian beekeepers who ensure that their bees are foraging in the pristine Australian environment (largely unpopulated national parks and forests). Australia arguably has the healthiest honey bees in the world², and is largely free of the major pests and diseases seen in other honey bee populations around the globe.

Did you know, 80% of the honey produced in Australia comes from Eucalyptus trees? Capilano receives over 500 different floral sources per year during the main production season which runs from Spring to Autumn with peak production in summer. Trees flower for around 4 weeks each year and the beekeepers will move their hives to follow the tree flowering cycle. Honey is an agriculture product – trees and the bees need the right environmental conditions to produce honey.

Classic Australian honey

Capilano’s 100% pure Australian Honey is made with Australian eucalypt and ground flora honeys, rich in character and flavour. These honeys consist of light and medium coloured and strong and mild flavoured honeys, which are carefully crafted together to provide a signature product with a consistently delicious flavour and colour. In times of extreme honey shortage, the colour and flavour of our 100% pure Australian honey may vary slightly due to the limited availability of Australian honey varieties available.

CAPILANO
CAPILANO

Capilano Pure Honey 500g

Proudly Australian Made & Owned, Capilano’s pure Australian honey is sourced from over 800 Aussie beekeeping families. Mild in flavor with a smooth, sweet finish this honey is a great all-rounder for the whole family
CAPILANO

Classic Honey

Our high quality, Classic Pure Australian range has graced Aussie brekky tables for generations. The honey we use in these family favourites is a symphony of 100% pure Australian eucalyptus and ground flora honeys. Mild in flavour, this range makes a perfect allrounder honey.

We promise to love and care for the bees that make it. To support the beekeepers that harvest it and help ensure their futures. To quality check every drop and deliver it, pure and simply to your home.

The Capilano Classic Honey range has been proudly Australian owned since 1953. Sourced from over 600 beekeeping families from across the country, we offer our customers a true, safe, and high-quality ‘hive to home’ experience.

A unique blend… our premium Classic Honey is a symphony of 100% pure, high quality Australian eucalyptus and ground flora honeys. Mild in flavour, this honey makes a perfect allrounder for the family. 

Enjoy our Classic honey… as a natural sweetener, drizzled on toast, porridge and crumpets or swirled into a warm glass of water or a smoothie.

Taste… mild, golden flavour with a smooth, sweet finish.

All Capilano product are packed in PET that is BPA-free.

CAPILANO

Recipes

Strawberry, Yoghurt and Ricotta Cake

Sriracha Sweet & Sour Meatballs

Banana Pikelets

Honey Mustard Chicken Potato Bake

Sticky Date Honey Cake

Honey Mojito

Salted Honey Gingernut Cheesecake

CAPILANO

Strawberry, Yoghurt and Ricotta Cake

Skill Level

Intermediate

  • Recipe
  • Ingredients
  • Instructions

Strawberry, Yoghurt and Ricotta Cake

 

This beautiful cake will really put a spring in your step! It is made with cannellini beans instead of butter, Capilano honey instead of refined sugar and is brimming with the rich creaminess of ricotta and toasty almond meal. A lovely cake to share with friends and family at peak strawberry season.

Ingredients

400g can no-added-salt cannellini beans, rinsed, drained
70g (¼ cup) natural yoghurt
3 tsp vanilla bean paste
4 eggs
125g Capilano Pure Honey
40g (¼ cup) plain flour (or gluten free plain flour)
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp cinnamon, ground
150g almond meal
To Serve
125g (½ cup) smooth ricotta
50g Capilano Pure Honey
130g (½ cup) natural yoghurt
400g fresh strawberries (½ for garnish, ½ for sauce)
2 tbsp Capilano Pure Honey, extra
  1. Preheat oven to 160°C (fan-forced). Grease and line base & sides of a 20cm cake tin with baking paper. Combine honey and eggs in the bowl of a stand mixter Whisk until pale and thick, approx. 5-6 mins.
  2. In a food processor combine drained cannellini beans, 70g yoghurt, cinnamon and vanilla. Blend until smooth.
  3. Add beans to egg mixture and sift flour, baking powder, almond meal on top. Gently fold on low speed until just combined being careful not to lose too much air in the mixture.
  4. Transfer mixture to prepared cake tin and bake for 40 mins. Check cake with a skewer in the middle - if it comes out clean the cake is ready. If it still needs a little more time, cover cake with foil and bake for an additional 10 mins until an inserted skewer comes out clean. Allow to cool completely before icing.
  5. Prepare strawberry sauce by combining 200g strawberries with honey and vanilla in a blender. Pulse until smooth and keep chilled until ready to serve.
  6. For icing, place ricotta, honey, 130g yoghurt and vanilla in the bowl of a stand mixture with paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed until smooth and voluminous. If too runny, chill until the mixture firms up again. Use a spatula to dollop into middle of cake and gently spread to sides of cake, just before serving. Icing will be soft and slightly runny. Top with fresh strawberries and strawberry sauce to serve.

Sriracha Sweet & Sour Meatballs

Skill Level

Easy

  • Recipe
  • Ingredients
  • Instructions

Sriracha Sweet & Sour Meatballs

Add a sweet-spicy kick to your next party or mid-week dinner with these moreish meatballs. The recipe is super flexible, simply choose your mince- pork, chicken or veal and get rolling. They’re perfect to freeze or prep ahead too!

Ingredients

Sauce
85ml (⅓ cup) rice vinegar
180g (½ cup) Capilano Pure Honey
1 tbsp soy sauce
3 tbsp tomato ketchup
2 tsp sriracha sauce
3 tbsp pineapple juice
½ tsp crushed garlic
½ tsp onion powder
1 tbsp corn flour
2 tbsp water

Meatballs
1kg minced pork or chicken
2 eggs
100g (1 cup) panko breadcrumbs
1 medium brown onion, finely chopped
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 tbsp vegetable oil, for frying.

To serve
Steamed jasmine rice
Stir-fried greens
Japanese mayonnaise

  1. Combine mince, eggs, breadcrumbs onion in large bowl; season. Using wet hands, roll rounded tablespoons of mixture into balls. Chill until ready to cook.
  2. For the sauce, in a small bowl, combine corn flour and water, mix well and set aside.
  3. Combine rice vinegar, honey, soy sauce, ketchup, sriracha, pineapple juice, garlic and onion powder in a medium-sized bowl. Whisk until well combined.
  4. Preheat oven to 180°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Heat a large frying pan with vegetable oil. Brown surface of meatballs in batches, being careful not to overcrowd the pan. Turn until brown on all sides then transfer to baking tray.
  5. Transfer sauce mixture into frypan and bring sauce to a simmer over medium-low heat. Add cornflour mixture and whisk constantly, until mixture thickens, approx. 1 minute. Remove from heat.
  6. Glaze meatballs with sweet and sour sauce and bake for 20 minutes until golden and glaze begins to caramelise.
  7. To serve, glaze meatballs with additional sauce and serve with jasmine rice, stir-fry vegetables and Kewpie mayonnaise, or as part of a party platter.

Banana Pikelets

Skill Level

Easy

  • Recipe
  • Info
  • Ingredients
  • Instructions

Banana Pikelets

Developed by Accredited Practicing Dietitian and Accredited Nutritionist, Joel Feren, featuring the purest choice, Capilano Organic.

Ingredients

1 cup wholemeal flour
1½ tsp. baking powder
2 medium bananas, mashed
¼ cup Capilano Organic honey
¾ cup milk
1 tsp. vanilla essence
  1. Whisk milk and egg together in a small mixing bowl.
  2. Sift flour into a large mixing bowl then add baking powder.
  3. Add milk and egg mixture to dry ingredients followed by honey, vanilla essence, and honey. Whisk well to combine.
  4. Heat a frying pan over medium heat. Grease with pure butter to prevent sticking.
  5. Use a soup ladle to add a small amount of mixture to the pan. Cook for 1-2 minutes, or until small bubbles appear on the surface.
  6. Turn pikelet over and cook other side for further 1 minute, or until golden brown.
  7. Repeat the process using the remaining mixture.
  8. Serve with drizzled Capilano honey and fresh banana.

Honey Mustard Chicken Potato Bake

Skill Level

Intermediate

  • Recipe
  • Ingredients
  • Instructions

Honey Mustard Chicken Potato Bake

Honey Mustard Chicken and Potato Bake? It doesn't get much better than this delicious combination to warm up on a cold winter evening.


Key equipment: Cast Iron Casserole Pot, Spray Oil, Measuring Cups
Honey Swap: 100%

Ingredients

1 tbsp vegetable oil
1 kg chicken thigh fillets, skin on
Sea salt & black pepper
250g streaky bacon, finely chopped
600g baby potatoes, skin-on, halved
3 cloves garlic, peeled and finely sliced
250ml (1 cup) pouring cream
2 ½ tbsp Dijon mustard
60g (2 ½ tbsp) Capilano Pure Honey
1 cup chicken stock
Thyme sprigs, to serve
Crusty bread (or garlic bread), Steamed greens (broccolini, snow peas) to serve
  1. Preheat oven to 180°C (fan-forced).
  2. Add bacon and potato to pot and cook for 5-6 minutes until golden. Add cream, garlic, mustard and stock, mix well. Add chicken back to pot and bring to a simmer.
  3. Cover pot with lid and cook in oven for 15 minutes. Remove lid, add thyme sprigs and cook an additional 10 minutes until surface is golden and potatoes are soft.
  4. Serve with steamed greens dressed in olive oil and sea salt flakes,and add an extra squeeze of honey to the casserole pot to serve.

Sticky Date Honey Cake

Skill Level

Intermediate

  • Recipe
  • Info
  • Ingredients
  • Instructions

Sticky Date Honey Cake

This classic winter treat will warm you to your toes! We have recreated this family favourite to swap out the brown sugar for our honey in the cake and divine salted honey sauce.

Key equipment: Food Processor, Kitchen Scales, Spray Oil, Measuring Cups
Honey Swap: 100%

Prep-ahead tips:
• Cake can be prepared and frozen for up to 8 weeks. See how in steps below.
• Honey caramel sauce can be prepared up to 2 weeks ahead and stored in a jar in the fridge. Gently warm by standing unopened jar in warm water, or microwave for 10-20 seconds to soften before serving.

General recipe tips:
• If you don’t have a food processor, this recipe can be mixed together with hand held beaters or a stand mixer. The dates will need to be finely chopped before soaking or pureed after soaking if you can.
• It is best to follow this recipe by the grams weight, affordable kitchen scales can be purchased at most supermarkets.
• Don’t forget to use a little cooking spray or vegetable oil in your measuring cup/bowl before weighing honey into it – this helps prevent honey sticking to the cup.
• If your cake begins to brown, be sure to cover it with foil – this is just because honey browns a little quicker than table sugar.

Ingredients

150ml boiling water
180g dried pitted dates, roughly chopped
1 ½ tsp bicarb soda
100g unsalted butter
150g Capilano Pure Honey
2 tsp vanilla extract
2 large eggs
200g (1 1/3 cups) plain flour or gluten-free plain flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 ½ tsp ground ginger
½ tsp ground cinnamon

SALTED HONEY SAUCE
200g caster sugar
125g Capilano Pure Honey
2 tsp water
250g sour cream
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
50g unsalted butter, chopped
½ tsp sea salt flakes

Ice cream or Greek-style yoghurt, to serve.

  1. Place dates in a medium heat proof bowl and sprinkle with bicarb soda. Top with boiling water and set aside for 20 minutes to soften.
  2. In a small saucepan or microwave safe bowl, combine butter, honey and vanilla extract. Heat on medium, stirring every 30 seconds until combined. Be careful not to over heat. Set aside to cool for 5 minutes.3
  3. Preheat oven to 160°C (fan-forced). Grease and line the base and sides of a 20cm springform cake tin with baking paper.4
  4. In a food processor, combine dates and water mixture, pulse until smooth. Add all remaining cake ingredients, pulse until just combined.5
  5. Transfer mixture to prepared tin and bake for 45 minutes, then remove from oven and cover cake with foil to prevent excess browning. Return to oven for an additional 15 minutes or until an inserted skewer comes out clean. Allow to cool for 15 minutes in tin before inverting onto serving plate. If the cake is slightly domed, use a serrated knife to carefully level before inverting.
  6. While cake is baking, prepare the sauce. Combine sugar, honey and water in a small saucepan over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Bring to a gentle boil without stirring, swirling the saucepan until the mixture is caramel colours. Remove from heat and whisk in vanilla, sour cream and butter.
  7. Return to heat for 1-2 minutes to ensure everything is combined, then add the salt and cool to room temperature.
  8. To serve, poke a few holes over the top of the cake using a fork or skewer, then pour over sauce and spread using the back of a spoon. Serve with additional sauce and Vanilla ice cream or Greek yoghurt.
  9. Storage: Iced or uniced cake will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 1 week. Simply warm gently in microwave before serving.
  10. To freeze: Uniced cake can be cooled, wrapped in cling wrap and stored in the freezer for up to 8 weeks. When ready to serve, simply thaw on the benchtop, remove cling wrap and gently warm cake in oven (100°C or microwave 30-60 seconds) then top with sauce to serve.

Honey Mojito

Skill Level

Easy

  • Recipe
  • Info
  • Ingredients
  • Instructions

Honey Mojito

A refreshing, refined sugar free take on your classic Mojito, Developed by Accredited Practicing Dietitian and Accredited Nutritionist, Joel Feren.

Ingredients

Ingredients:
½ cup Capilano honey
2 tbsp. water
¼ lime
4 mint leaves
3x 2cm x 2cm pieces of honeydew
1 cup soda water
  1. Add honeydew, mint and lime to a highball glass. Use a muddler to crush the mint, lime and honeydew.
  2. Add 1 tbsp. honey (Optional: warm honey to help it mix in better).
  3. Add soda water and ice to serve.

Salted Honey Gingernut Cheesecake

Skill Level

Intermediate

  • Recipe
  • Info
  • Ingredients
  • Instructions

Salted Honey Gingernut Cheesecake

We’ve dialled up the sweet-salty factor on this iconic recipe, made with all honey instead of sugar, an irresistible salted honey drizzle and moreish gingernut biscuit base.

Prep-ahead tips:
• Cheesecake base mixture can be prepared ahead of time. Either prepare crumb mixture and chill in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks or freeze for 3 months. To prepare, warm the crumb mixture on the benchtop or in the microwave for 10 seconds to soften (if a cold day), then press into prepared tin.
• Honey sauce can be prepared up to 4 weeks ahead and stored in a jar in the fridge.
• Cheesecake can be baked and kept chilled in an airtight container for up to 3 days. Decorate with cream and honey sauce when ready to serve.


General recipe tips
• It is best to follow this recipe by the grams weight, affordable kitchen scales can be purchased at most supermarkets.
• Don’t forget to use a little cooking spray or vegetable oil in your measuring cup/bowl before weighing honey into it – this helps prevent honey sticking to the cup.
• Try to give your cheesecake time to slowly cool. If you pull it quickly from the oven, or place a warm cheesecake in the fridge, cracks may appear.

Ingredients

165g ginger nut biscuits (or gluten free sweet biscuits + 1 tsp ground ginger)
50g unsalted butter, melted
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
500g cream cheese, softened
2 tbsp plain flour (or gluten free plain)
150g Capilano Pure Honey
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 eggs, plus 1 yolk, extra
150g sour cream

 

TOPPING

150g sour cream (thick part only, do not over-mix)
150g Capilano Pure Honey
1 tsp lemon juice
Pinch sea salt flakes

  1. Preheat oven to 160°C (fan-forced). Grease and line the base of a 20cm springform cake tin with baking paper.
  2. Place biscuits in a food processor and pulse until fine. Add melted butter and vanilla, pulse until combined. Press mixture into base of cake tin using the back of a metal spoon to smooth ensuring the biscuits are well compacted. Chill until ready to bake.
  3. In a stand mixer with paddle attachment, mix softened cream cheese on medium speed until smooth, approx. 1-2 minutes. Add honey, sour cream and vanilla, mix until combined, then add eggs and yolk 1 at a time, beating in between until smooth. Sift flour into bowl and fold on low speed until just incorporated.
  4. Place tin on a baking tray. Transfer cheesecake mixture into tin and bake for 40 minutes until mixture is set but still wobbly. Leave cheesecake in oven with oven turned off and door ajar for 1 hour until cooled, to prevent cracks forming. Allow to cool to room temperature on benchtop before chilling at least 4 hours or ideally overnight.
  5. While cheesecake is baking, prepare salted honey sauce. Combine honey, 1 tbsp water and lemon juice in a small saucepan over low heat. Heat until small bubbles begin to form, and swirl (without mixing) until mixture is golden brown and caramelised (2-4 minutes approx.). Stir in sea salt flakes and allow to cool. Transfer to a jar or airtight container until ready to serve.
  6. To serve, spread thick sour cream over top of cheesecake creating swirls using a palette knife or spatula. Gently warm honey caramel by standing container in warm water. Drizzle sauce over top of cheesecake and finish with sea salt flakes.
  7. Cheesecake will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 1 week.